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THE ENFORCER
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2009 Can-Am Outlander 800R XT Review

<body><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="border-collapse: collapse" bordercolor="#111111" width="100%" id="AutoNumber1"> <tr><td width="100%"><p align="justify">Hey ATVT readers! I’m kicking of a series of reviews on the 2009 Can-Am Outlander 800R XT. The first review will be taking a look at the some of the more simple things. What do I mean simple? I’m referring to racks, bumpers, and other common items found on Utility ATVs. Let’s see how they stack up.</td></tr></table><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="border-collapse: collapse" bordercolor="#111111" width="100%" id="AutoNumber2"><tr><td width="100%" colspan="4"><p align="justify"><b>RACKS & BUMPERS</b><br />I’ve never seen this caliber bumper on a stock rig. These bumpers are very large compared to its closest competitors. In fact, if we want to look for a bumper that compares we’d have to look at Kimpex, Moose or Bison bumpers. They sport a 1”-2” diameter and protect the entire front AND rear of the ATV. Truth be known, I’m not going to go out and bash into a tree or whatever to “test” the functionality of these large bumpers, BUT I have issued a few respectable blows to them. All of the impacts but one happened to be trees and there are no visible scuffs and certainly no bends. If and when I do get a gnarly hit, I will provide an update with the results. The racks on the Outlander 800R are definitely respectable. They offer a fairly level perch for your gear and are very solid with integrated storage. About the storage, the 800R isn’t overloaded with it, but it does offer some under the rear rack. Downfall? What if I want to mount a box? </td></tr><tr><td width="25%" align="center"><a href="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/CA-B01.jpg" target="_blank"><img border="0" src="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/thumbs/CA-B01.png" width="218" height="169"></a></td><td width="25%" align="center"><a href="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/CA-B02.jpg" target="_blank"><img border="0" src="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/thumbs/CA-B02.png" width="220" height="170"></a></td><td width="25%" align="center"><a href="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/CA-B03.jpg" target="_blank"><img border="0" src="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/thumbs/CA-B03.png" width="220" height="170"></a></td><td width="25%" align="center"><a href="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/CA-B04.jpg" target="_blank"><img border="0" src="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/thumbs/CA-B04.png" width="220" height="170"></a></td></tr></table><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="border-collapse: collapse" bordercolor="#111111" width="100%" id="AutoNumber3"><tr><td width="100%" colspan="4"><p align="justify"><b>INSTRUMENT PANEL & HAND GUARDS</b><br />The instrument panel is very nice in my opinion. It has a digital tachometer, hour & minute meter, odometer, fuel level, speedometer, transmission indicator, 4WD indicator and it allows you select between a few different displays to suit your needs. The lights are controlled by the key switch. Turn it once and you have headlights twice you don’t. As a safety, the tail light stays on all the time and will remain on for 30 seconds after the switch is turned off. The 800R XT comes with hand guards out of the factory. These are not like the after market hand guards you can buy for your Utility ATV. They are complete. They cover the entire bar to give it a stream lined look and they function just like any other you can buy. They deflect stuff well and appear to be built of quality material. </td><tr><td width="25%" align="center"><a href="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/CA-H01.jpg" target="_blank"><img border="0" src="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/thumbs/CA-H01.png" width="220" height="170"></a></td><td width="25%" align="center"><a href="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/CA-H02.jpg" target="_blank"><img border="0" src="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/thumbs/CA-H02.png" width="220" height="170"></a></td><td width="25%" align="center"><a href="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/CA-H03.JPG" target="_blank"><img border="0" src="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/thumbs/CA-H03.png" width="220" height="170"></a></td><td width="25%" align="center"><a href="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/CA-P01.JPG" target="_blank"><img border="0" src="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/thumbs/CA-P01.png" width="220" height="170"></a></td></tr></table><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="border-collapse: collapse" bordercolor="#111111" width="100%" id="AutoNumber4"><tr><td width="100%" colspan="2"><p align="justify"><b>WINCH</b><br />All Utility ATVs are coming with winches these days. But a 3,000lb winch? With a sealed line? AND a remote WITH a built in storage for the remote? That’s pushing the bar in my opinion. It works just like a winch. Pulls stuff in and the quad out.</td></tr><tr><td width="50%" align="center"><a href="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/CA-W01.jpg" target="_blank"><img border="0" src="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/thumbs/CA-W01.png" width="219" height="170"></a></td><td width="50%" align="center"><a href="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/CA-W02.JPG" target="_self"><img border="0" src="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/thumbs/CA-W02.png" width="217" height="170"></a></td></tr></table><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="border-collapse: collapse" bordercolor="#111111" width="100%" id="AutoNumber5"><tr><td width="100%" colspan="2"><p align="justify"><b>FLOOR BOARDS</b><br />Do you ever wish you could keep your footing when riding aggressively on your Utility ATV? They make after market extended foot pegs to assist in this department. Can-Am said we can do that. Right off the show room floor you get the extended foot pegs. (So you can hold on as the 800 deals its hand!) The rest of the floor board is the same as any other but it certainly feels roomy. You can see my size 10 wide with room to grow in the picture below. </td></tr><tr><td width="50%" align="center"><a href="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/CA-F01.jpg" target="_blank"><img border="0" src="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/thumbs/CA-F01.png" width="220" height="170"></a></td><td width="50%" align="center"><a href="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/CA-F02.jpg" target="_blank"><img border="0" src="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/thumbs/CA-F02.png" width="220" height="170"></a></td></tr></table><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="border-collapse: collapse" bordercolor="#111111" width="100%" id="AutoNumber6"><tr><td width="100%" colspan="2"><p align="justify"><b>TIRES</b><br />The XT’s tires are another high point. The 26” Radial Carlisle's that come on the Can-Am 800 XT are very nice compared to most other stock tires. They have excellent forward traction, decent stability, and seem to be fairly puncture resistant so far and to top it off, they’re radials. I’ll update on these tires as I get more miles on them. </td></tr><tr><td width="50%" align="center"><a href="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/CA-T01.jpg" target="_blank"><img border="0" src="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/thumbs/CA-T01.png" width="220" height="170"></a></td><td width="50%" align="center"><a href="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/CA-T02.JPG" target="_blank"><img border="0" src="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/thumbs/CA-T02.png" width="220" height="170"></a></td></tr></table><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="border-collapse: collapse" bordercolor="#111111" width="100%" id="AutoNumber7"><tr><td width="100%"><p align="justify"><b>EXTRA</b><br />BRP has included mounts for off road lights on the 09 XT. I give them a thumb up for thinking about it, but I give it a thumb down for being a low mount. In Can-Am’s defense I’ll say that this is probably aimed at the consumers who can road license the quad because a set of signal lamps would fit in there precisely.</td></tr><tr><td width="100%"><p align="center"> <a href="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/CA-B01.jpg" target="_blank"><img border="0" src="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/thumbs/CA-B01.png" width="218" height="169"></a></td></tr></table><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="border-collapse: collapse" bordercolor="#111111" width="100%" id="AutoNumber8"><tr><td width="100%">I hope you have enjoyed the first segment of the Can-Am Outlander 800R XT Review Series. There is a LOT more to follow. </td></tr><tr><td width="100%"><p align="center"><a href="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/01.jpg" target="_blank"><img border="0" src="http://www.atvtorture.com/forums/images/canamouty/thumbs/01.png" width="219" height="153"></a></td></tr></table><p align="justify"> <br /><br /><br /></p>
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Click Here to Read Part II

[BREAK=Part II - The Ride]

2009 Can-Am Outlander 800R XT Review – Part 2

The Ride
Welcome back to Part 2 of the 09 Outlander review. In this segment I will be covering the Suspension, Ride-ability, and Ergonomics. I’ll start with the facts.
Frame - SST
Front Suspension Type - Double A-arm, Forged Aluminum upper arm
Travel - 8 in (203 mm)
Rear Suspension Type - TTI independent
Travel - 9 in (229 mm)
Front Brake - 2 inboard hydraulic discs
Rear Brake - 1 inboard hydraulic disc
L x W x H (in) - 86 x 46 x 45 in
L x W x H (mm) - 2.184 x 1.168 x 1.143 mm
Wheelbase - 51 in (1.295 mm)
Seat Height - 34.5 in (877 mm)
Ground Clearance - 12 in (305 mm)
Dry Weight - 663 lbs (301 kg)
Towing Capacity - 1300 lbs (590 kg)
Rack Capacity - 100 lbs (45 kg)
Rear Rack Capacity - 200 lbs (90 kg)
Storage - Rear storage 5.3 US gal (20L)
Fuel Capacity - 5.3 US gal. (20 L)

Those numbers are pretty spectacular and speak for themselves, but let’s move along to see if BRP can put their wheels where there numbers are. I’m going to start with the ergonomics. Keep in mind, this is a very difficult area to write about and this is my report on how the Outlander 800 fits me. It may be different for you, but after reading this you should have a better idea of what to expect, and from that you can draw your own conclusions.

ERGONOMICS:
Now this is where it’s going to sound like BRP has paid me to talk about the Outlander 800 (they haven’t). The ergonomics of the 2009 Can-Am Outlander 800 simply works for me. The seat feels nice and roomy no matter what stance I take. The handlebars also have a natural feeling to them. I’ve been on some quads where I immediately felt like an addition to the quad. This is not the case with the Outlander. I feel like the quad was meant to have me on it. I sit relatively low with my arms extended just about perfectly in almost a natural angle. BRP, in my humble opinion, did an outstanding job in this aspect of the design. I’m very pleased with the fitment of this ATV. If I were forced to find one thing wrong, I would reluctantly complain about the handlebar grips. Yep, that’s it.

SUSPENSION:
Ok, so the numbers above say a lot. But how do those numbers translate to actual performance? The Outlander has adjustable shocks all the way around, but there was no need to touch them off the showroom floor. The ATV handled well in all types of terrain. It handles fast, hard hitting trails with minimal feedback or back-steer. Having said all that, I feel the Outlander is set-up more for performance than farm chores, although it handles those with ease as well. I wouldn’t recommend going out and trying to make a “Bomb Squad” movie with these shocks, but for the average rider, they will do nicely. I think this can be attributed to BRP’s approach to the design. Take a look at the picture below. This is BRP’s TTI or Trailing Torsional Independent suspension. Basically the shocks sit ahead of the wheels and this allows the wheel to travel straight up and down instead of in and out. This translates to keeping the tread on the ground. The front suspension is a double A-Arm design with aluminum upper. This has proven to be a great combination in my book.


As mentioned, there was no need to adjust the shocks, but I did, just because I could. I softened the rear and stiffened the front and vice versa. Each achieved the desired result nicely. And unlike some others I’ve played with, I felt a difference with one click instead of having to crank it fully one way or the other to feel any change. And at this time, I have not found the limits of this suspension. I’m sure in time I will find it, and I will be sure to report it.
It’s hard to find anything wrong with this ATV’s handling characteristics at this point. It sucks up the bumps, takes the hits, negotiates the tuff stuff, and is easy on the butt. It has seemed to give me a certain sense of confidence when riding.

RIDE-ABILITY:
There is no real way for me to translate the ride of the Outlander 800R to you. The ride-ability is supreme. The quad will take power slides like a sport quad (with knobby tires) and muscle through the technical areas like a jeep and honestly, there isn’t much I can add that I haven’t already said in the article above. It is a “confidence inspiring” ride for sure.

Click Here to Read Part III


[BREAK=Part III ENGINE, CVT, 4x4, FRAME, OVER-ALL OPINION]

2009 CAN-AM OUTLANDER 800R XT REVIEW – PART 3

ENGINE, CVT, 4x4, FRAME, OVER-ALL OPINION



Welcome to the third and final write-up on the 2009 Outlander 800 in which we will get to the “meat” of the review. In this part I will cover the engine, the CVT, the 4x4, the frame, and give my over-all opinion of the ATVT.

THE ENGINE

When most people hear the words Can-Am and Outlander they usually think of one thing; power. This is not without reason. Previous model years of the Outlander are very strong machines. The 800 H.O. engine has been recognized across the ATV community as being a power house, so how does the 800R engine stack up? Unfortunately I could not dyno one or both of the machines to give you the exact numbers, but I can tell you the power is awesome for a Utility ATV. The 800R offers a smooth power curve with its weak point being in the low end which is more of a CVT issue than a power issue. This is also one of those motors that truly break-in. I have heard stories about an ATV suddenly hitting a point where they just come to life. A night and day difference when they break-in. Such was the case with the 2009 Outlander. I can not pin point the exact day or mileage it happened, but it was sometime shortly after the 1st service (10 hour service). I just remember one day thinking “oh boy! This thing is hauling!” It literally became faster off the line and when I was cruising in the mid power curve and punched the throttle, it responded immediately with a burst of speed and torque that surpassed any previous runs. The same thing applies to the high-end of the power curve. The difference simply amazed me. The quad is still performing to this standard if not a bit stronger. If you are looking for power, this machine definitely needs your attention.

The Rotax 800R EFI V-twin engine is still the most powerful engine in the industry*. The liquid-cooled, single overhead cam power plant has four valves per cylinder and is fed by a 46-mm throttle body and two VDO Siemens‡ fuel injectors. The EFI system keeps the 800R engine’s performance at its peak. The progressive throttle ensures power is manageable whether in precise rock crawling or opening it up on the straights.

THE CVT

This is where my first real complaints will surface. I’ve talked with several other owners and they agreed with my findings with a large nod. I’ll start on a positive note. I’ve not had any real problems with the CVT. It performs every time and has never left me walking. It has an awesome mid and high range power curve. Now I’ll touch on the other stuff. Although it is not weak, the low end is the “weak” point. It has slight click or clank followed with a slight jerk when the clutch engages. This is about 16-1700 RPMs and is very frustrating to me. The CVT also has a very mechanical sound to it when it is in neutral or park. There is nothing wrong with it I presume, but it just makes a noise that I’m not accustomed to. The CVT is also very difficult to shift which has been attributed to the bearings used and can be fixed for around $30-$40. My final notes on the CVT will address the intakes of the Outlander. I’ll be straight forward again. If you plan to frequently hit water/mud in excess of 12 inches, you will want to snorkel the ATV. The CVT intake and exhaust are pretty vulnerable. Fortunately the fix is cheap and easy. You can read a detailed write-up on how to stealth snorkel your Can-Am in our Can-Am Forum.


THE FOUR-WHEEL DRIVE

I’ve not heard many good things about the four-wheel drive system in the Can-Ams and I’ve even watched these systems fail. HOWEVER, I sincerely believe BRP has addressed the problems of the past and improved the VISCO-LOK system. It engages smoothly and delivers the power where it is needed when you need it. I have not been in a situation yet where this system has failed me and I haven’t been easy on it. I will still argue that a selectable locker is preferable for extremely technical terrain, but I also argue that the 2009 Outlander VISCO-LOK will get the job done if you know how to ride and for those that never see the extreme technical stuff, this 4x4 system will do everything you ever want under normal riding conditions.


THE FRAME

The continuous-construction steel SST frame provides more strength than traditional tubular-construction frames. This technology also provides a lower center of gravity, ultimately leading to better handling. There are fewer welds, less material, and less weight.

Another rumored weak point of the Can-Am Outlander, right? It stands to reason with many reports of people bending and cracking these frames. And I will admit a set of skids is on my list of upgrades to do. However, let’s look at an arguing point. “Most” of the people who damage these frames are using the ATV’s for extreme riding. That is, riding outside the manufactures recommended parameters. Although the 2009 Outlander has the power of a street bike, it is not. It is a Utility quad. Anyone who races their ATV upgrades to skids no matter the make and model. The Outlander is no exception. If you are going to ride these quads hard you better invest in a set of skids. If you are going to use your quad for “normal” riding, I’m not convinced that skids are a necessity, but there are those rumors and they beg attention. To date, I’ve hit downed trees and large rocks at average riding speeds and not had any problems.

OVERALL OPINION
Now you’ve read my honest take on this ATV and you may be wondering; “is this ATV for me?” If you want a quad to mud with right out of the box or a slow technical “farm quad”, then you will want to consider some other brands. If you are looking for a quad that delivers power, performance, and adrenaline with the convenience of a utility ATV, then look no further than the Can-Am Outlander 800. This ATV has amazed me from the time I first saw it at the dealer to the last time I rode it. It is a fast, fun machine that gives a boost of confidence on the trails and will leave you with a permanent smile after it’s broken in. For me, this quad is great. I can use this quad for farm chores and when I’m done I can smoke the trails at a blistering pace. All ATV’s have their weak points. It’s up to you, the consumer, to decide which benefits you want/need the most. We’re here to lay down the facts so you are better prepared to make that decision.
 

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THE ENFORCER
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2,037 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I am so tired of reading about these Can Am 800's. If only BRP would build a closer dealer to me
Durn thing is you've been reading about the <08 models. The 09 claims horse power riveling the increasingly famous Polaris 850! Just like the old song dude...."you ain't seen nothin yet"! (Yet to be proven but it's on my list of things...)

About the dealership...I drove 200 miles one way to purchase mine and I have to drive 40 miles to get it serviced! Sometimes you just gotta do what you gotta do.
 

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SMILEY WHORE
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1,028 Posts
Well, I'm a Yamaha Grizzly fan myself .... however, one brother has a Can-AM 800 2-up machine which I like a lot.

And even though each brand has a few things I like more than another brand, I find these types of reviews very interesting.

So, great job so far Battlegun. I will be looking forward to your ongoing "product review" of your Can-Am. :cheer:

Thanks ... :eek:ccasion14:


Later ....
 

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103 Posts
BG that is an impressive looking machine! I will side with Gunny that I really love my yamaha's, but in a few years when I am in the market for a new one, maybe can'am will be the way to go. Keep 'em coming!
 

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SMILEY WHORE
Joined
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1,028 Posts
My pleasure Battlegun (about reading your reviews) ... and if I ever decide to buy a new machine, I'm gonna have to agree with Grizz Rider ... and take a long hard look at the Can-Am.

Oh crap ... if I did ... my younger bro would be all over me .... sigh !!


Later ....
 

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Premium Member
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155 Posts
Great review so far. The Can-Ams have me drooling. While I dream of the Renegade, I think the Outty would be the one for me. I do too much trail work to be without racks. Maybe I'll hit the lottery and get both:)
 

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Premium Member
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155 Posts
You can buy racks for the Gade.
I know, but that would be kind of like a roof rack on a Corvette, just wrong. Those things look way too cool just the way they are.
 
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